Seeing Event Photography Differently

Seeing Event Photography Differently

This summer and fall have been full of wonderful events – from book launches, to beer festivals and celebrations of powerful women in the arts. One thing they all have in common (along with the many events we have covered over the years) is ever changing lighting conditions.

Of all the things I considered writing about on this topic the one I felt would be the most helpful for a client is how to plan for successful photography at an event.

Let there be light.

The first rule of events is to light your anyone who speaks or performs on stage.

Do not assume the ambient light in the room will suffice, for example, light from the ceiling does not flatter the face creating shadows under the hairline, eyes and nose, and the neck.

Instead light the stage with a light that hits the face at a , we had some lovely lighting at the last Whitby Courthouse event and from Leo at Rent-a-Stage Canada at Whitby Beerfest. I won’t get too technical (mainly because stage lighting is not my expertise) however using a series of lights at a 45 degree angle is ideal for a stationary speaker (experts will tell you there is more to the science so using the in house professionals is always a good idea). 

So if we are candid about time, daylight wins.

As the images we took at the Wild Nellies “Celebration of Women” shows working in low light or stage light can be amazing. It will however never quite add up to the beauty Mother Nature dishes up in that golden hour or through filtered window light at an event for clear, beautiful images.

Deciding when (i.e. what month of the year) and where to host your event will impact the look of the images. Natural light images were par for the course at Beerfest until the sun went down. On the lit stage at the Whitby Courthouse theatre we used the stage lighting from the lighting booth upstairs in the theatre. At the SG we used a mixture of natural light, flash and ambient lighting to capture the Drawing for Art event.

In the dark of the night.

In the absense of light and to grab images of tables at charity events such as “Starry Nights” hosted each June by the YWCA we use flash. A diffuser on the on camera light literally douses the area in front of you in light and the further away the subject is from the light source (you and your camera) the less light there is (we call that light fall off).

We recommend holding a pose for a few minutes to give the photographer a few takes. This accounts for movement, focusing and closed eyes – which the more people in a photo the more chance of a blinker.

At the podium? Here are a few tips.

If I could give someone speaking one word of advice I would say stop, look up and smile for a period of time longer than YOU think needed. This gives eye contact to the audience and gives us the 10 seconds or longer needed to take the ideal shot of you.

The pause removes shapes created by talking and replaces them with a smile. Eyes are not diverted to the podium or page but instead at your audience. Light is hitting your face and not being shadowed by a microphone. In the end this simple change will help create more effective shots of your event and your speakers/performers. 

We love working your events and if you have any further questions about our services please connect with us.

For more of our event work visit: Events

Kirsten McGoey | Visual Storyteller | www.trinitydesign.ca

Fall in love with your family all over again.

Fall in love with your family all over again.

Every time I walk through our rooms in the house I am falling back in love with experiences.

The first time our son ran a cross country race, the droplets of water that shook off him as he started the 1500 m in grade 4 and his recent graduation from grade school. The look on our middle son’s face as he danced ballet on stage for the first time, the love we have on our faces when we hugged on the grass near Cullen Central park during a family session. The crazy smile our third gives me every single time and I am worried one day will fade away.

Limited Space this fall.

  From toddlers, to teens and in-betweens – we capture all the experiences – including that new puppy.

Kirsten McGoey | Visual Storyteller | @trinitydesignwhitby

Sprout Galleries – Download 101

Sprout Galleries – Download 101

Step 1

The link from your email will bring you to a gallery cover page.

NOTE: Images should never be saved to a phone – download only to a desktop and then cloud the images as hard drives fail. Storage options such as Dropbox and Google Drive offer free cloud options up to a specific size of storage.

 

Step 2

In the top right hand corner is a circle icon with a person inside. This will allow you to move from viewing the gallery to entering as a client. Click that icon to access the sign in panel which will slide out from the right.

 

Step 3

Enter the user name and password cited in your email. (if applicable) 

Step 4

Now that you are signed in you will have access to download in two ways. Click on a single image’s download cloud icon to initiate the download of one image or click on the DOWNLOAD icon at the top right to initiate the enter gallery download.

 

Step 5

The next screen tells you your images will be emailed to you. Note the preparation of that email typically takes 10-15 minutes and there are still steps ahead to complete the process so you are not finished yet.

Step 6

The next step is to click the link in the email the gallery sends you to download the images to your desktop.

NOTE: Again, do not complete this on your phone, use your desktop.

Step 7

The link will bring you back to a page where the download of a .zip file will commence after clicking the button below named in this case Download Part 1 of 1. The zip file will download to the specified area you have decided for downloads so be aware of that location.

Step 8

Load all your content to a server that is NOT your hard drive or an external hard drive. One copy should be on a cloud such as iCloud, Dropbox or Google Drive for safe keeping.

Enjoy your files and thanks for using this tutorial blog to learn about our new system!

To learn more about our services click: Investment

Kirsten McGoey | Visual Storyteller | Trinity Design Photography

The Visual Story of PR Professional: Kelsey Muir

The Visual Story of PR Professional: Kelsey Muir

During the summer months, with more outside portraits, it is always lovely to come home to some studio work. Kelsey has been working in the Public Relations field for 5 years. She wanted to add some strong portraits to her social media touch points (Facebook, Linked In, etc).

We worked in the studio to create this sleek look for Kelsey. The grey has just a touch of Navy from her outfit and add contrast to her hair and eyes. We used a medium grey paper to create the foundation before adding in some navy in post.

For this experience Kelsey booked a professional stylist and makeup artist. The effects speak for themselves and when you feel your best our job is always easier. 

 Kesley nailed this image first frame she was so relaxed in front of the camera. We created the other shots by working through a series poses and outfits to get the look and style that works for this Public Relations professional.

Kirsten McGoey | Visual Storyteller | Trinity Design Photography

The Visual Story of a CAO : Matthew Gaskell

The Visual Story of a CAO : Matthew Gaskell

Trinity-Design-2618RR-MG-WEB-HEADSHOT

A headshot session is an opportunity to create a portrait that connect clients, colleagues and more with the subject. Matthew is an “accomplished municipal leader who possesses the ability to envision and implement strategic changes to service delivery and deliver mission-critical results.” His portrait needed to align with his career.

For Matthew’s portrait we used a familiar location and paired it with key wardrobe choices to create a strong, professional and approachable look.

LOcation – Brock St Espresso, Whitby
The soft light of the windows at Brock St Espresso are amazing for strong natural light, headshots with catch lights in the eyes.

For Matthew’s portrait we used a familiar location and paired it with key wardrobe choices to create a strong, professional and approachable look. Using both a suit and a more casual jacket/vest combination to create variety in his options (our The Professional Experience sessions give you three headshot images).

We love it when the client shows up in Trinity Design purple accessories.

Looking to create a fresh new headshot for your profile? We can help.

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Kirsten McGoey | Visual Storyteller | Trinity Design Photography

Natural Light v. Studio Light v. Off Camera Flash – is there one that is better?

Natural Light v. Studio Light v. Off Camera Flash – is there one that is better?

Natural Light v. Studio Light
v. Off Camera Flash –
is there one that is better?

When I started photographing professionally I was a committed natural light photographer. I would defend my choices with a staunch love for golden hour light, the gleam it gives eyes and the feeling you get when the light is just right. Spoiler alert – I was wrong.

Using natural light from the large three story tall windows at Whitby’s Little Beasts Brewing Company was the right choice for this session for the 2018 Explore + Experience Whitby magazine. (April 2018)

Fast forward 6.5 years to current day and my art uses the best light for the situation at hand. Natural light is amazing and I still love it. I still love to shoot family sessions in the golden hour but the reality is the majority of the work I do does not occur in ideal lighting settings. Dark restaurants, moody event halls and locations with different light situations in different rooms (always a fun challenge).

We paired natural light and a diffused, studio strobe to showcase A Tavola’s chef Vito Clemente in his expanded location in Whitby. (April 2018, Explore + Experience Whitby)

I read recently in a workshop description that a client was thrilled that they had learned how to shoot without a flash. They were quoted as this being the reason their photos now “look(ed) different”.

I respectfully beg to differ.

I believe studio light, off camera flash and the ability to see natural light in new, exciting ways is what makes a business stand out. Conversely what makes a professional photographer a stronger artist, more capable of delivering the services your brand, business or publication will need.

Using my Canon flash on camera to light up the night in the every changing light situations of the Drawing for Art event at the Station Gallery. The art of bouncing light is a challenge I love. (April 2019, Drawing for Art)

Instagram is flooded with natural light look alike photography – this style is a trend and it’s a trend new influencers/businesses are rejecting. Gone are the days of white walls, carefully picked accessories and that over exposed styling as businesses embrace images with strong storytelling that align with their business goals and brand.

The reality is each brand needs photography that aligns with it’s look and feel. To create content for a business that is the same as everyone else defeats the purpose of creating unique, custom and branded content.

The fusion of natural light with just a touch of a studio strobe to create this dreamy light that captured the lemon merengue tarts at M&R Catering for the 2018 issue
of Explore + Experience Whitby cover.

The more important question when hiring someone to assist you with your professional photography needs is can they use all forms of light? Studio light for headshots with catch lights, hair lights and light that wraps around the subject to create a portrait. Off camera flash which will add definition when shooting a dish at a restaurant. Knowing where to pose clients in natural light to use it to it’s fullest potential.

Interested in working with us to enhance your brand with a full range of skills in light from natural light, studio light and off camera flash? Connect with us via our website form: CONNECT


Kirsten McGoey | Visual Storyteller | www.trinitydesign.ca