Art in Isolation: Being Creative During the Pandemic

Art in Isolation: Being Creative During the Pandemic

Trinity Design Photography is pairing up remotely with the Station Gallery in Whitby to show how creativity at home can add to the quality of time spent home with loved ones. This mural project requires the following:

– a window pane

– acrylic or tempra paint

– a few drops of dish soap (in the paint)

– paint brushes

– painter’s tape

– optional but handy, an exacto knife and ruler (to make the painters tape strips smaller

Step One – Clean your window panes so there is no debris or dirt.

Step Two – Mask off the window into sections. We chose a traditional geometric design.

Step Three – Mix paint with a few drops of dish soap in each colour, this will help removal at a later date.

Step Four – Paint one colour per section ensuring that the colours are evenly spaced so as to make a pleasing pattern. There is no wrong way to do this so have some fun.

TIP: Make patterns in the wet paint to add visual interest such as circles, waves and diamonds with the edge of the brush, you could even finger paint.

Step Five – Once dry remove the painters tape – this will give you mullions of clear glass to finish of the window.

Step Six – Enjoy the fruits of your labours from both inside and outside the window pane. Outside will be much more opaque than the inside and give you a different POV on the artwork.

To join the Station Gallery as a member visit their website: https://www.stationgallery.ca/

To see more of our photography visit our Portfolios ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Kirsten McGoey | Visual Storyteller | www.trinitydesign.ca

 

 

 

Opinion: The Front Porch Project Trend

Opinion: The Front Porch Project Trend

Surf social media, turn on local news and you have likely seen the trend during COVID-19 to raise money or generate business using the concept of the Front Porch Projects.

In so far as my community discussions amongst some of the top photographers in North America this was the brain child of a lovely photographer in Massachussetts. I want to stress this was an idea born out of community, love for clients and the need for connection in a very unprecedented time. That is important because I do not think when it was born in the minds and hearts of then many other photographers any intentions were anything but honourable.

There are several reasons why we are not offering these sessions: 

ONE:  COVID-19 is a new coronavirus and our medical community has an evolving understanding of transmission. To work with clients means taking on risks that I am not prepared as an insured photographic professional. Kids like to run around and I do not want to break their bubble or my own.

TWO:  On the whole family photography is a luxury item in our list of services. While it does nourish the soul it is not an essential service during the COVID-19 Pandemic. All the messages we are getting from all levels of government here are this is not business as usual for photographers.

THREE: You have heard the directive from Justin Trudeau on how we beat the virus. Stay home. Stay healthy. That does not include travelling to client homes to take photos. It is as simple as that. While it was not as clearly stated a few weeks ago the next few weeks are key in flattening the curve in our Region and I intend to follow that directive.

Does this mean in the future the idea of Front Porch Sessions is a bad idea?

I do not think anyone can answer that. It is a lovely way to capture a family – just not at this time.

Stay healthy.

Stay home.

We encourage you take lots of photos of your self isolation because this is a time to document – using a phone right up to a professional camera (if you have one) – so one day you can show your grandkids what the COVID-19 pandemic life in 2020 was like.

We will be here to capture the experience when the restrictions are lifted.

Kirsten McGoey | Visual Storyteller at Trinity Design Photography 

The Visual Story of Erin Haig

The Visual Story of Erin Haig

Creating images with professionals has become one of my favourite parts of photography. Each professional has their own needs balanced with that of the company they work for. Images that connect you with someone often before you have even met them in person.

In  a world with a camera on every phone we have forgotten the power of a professional headshot. An image is digested by your brain in just 13 milliseconds. People looking at your headshot will judge you on your appearance, they judge your intelligence and your socio-economic status. When partnered with a job search or in partnership with a business or your own brand a head shot becomes a key part of your first contact. Using a muddy cellphone shot of you in your car is literally leaving a key part of your brand out of the mix from the very beginning.

With these new looks there Erin has a strong series of looks that compliment her role as a Human Resources professional. Her new images show a stylish, professional and capable professional in her field.

This pose uses a table lined with the same seamless black paper we used in this session. I love the way the paper and her dress become a frame for her face. Her expression while not smiling but has warmth and a strong elegance.

Our new brown Thonet (or ice cream) chair provided a perfect prop for this pose. Our client is wearing a classic jacket, one of her own faves which gives this portrait texture and another timeless look.

A bonus shot for this client I loved the way we used this jacket collar along with her hand placement to create a strong, engaging portrait. The same chair was used but you cannot see it – with the famous “Rhonda” pose we often use in studio.

The “Rhonda” pose showed up twice in this gallery as the client loved the pose with this jacket. This jacket reminds me of the designs of Chanel – another classic to round out this session.

If you are looking to update your professional look connect with us for your update.

Kirsten McGoey | Visual Storyteller | trinitydesign.ca

Durham ETFO Event Coverage

Durham ETFO Event Coverage

We provide event photography coverage for a variety of clients across the Durham Region and Greater Toronto Area. We recently hit the ground at 6 different locations in Pickering, Ajax, Whitby, Brooklin and Oshawa to show the strike action on January 30, 2020.

Need event coverage/images? Connect with us:
https://trinitydesign.ca/connect-2/

The Visual Story of Nicolee Evans

The Visual Story of Nicolee Evans

An experienced professional in the mortgaging business, Nicolee Evans, works with the Element Mortgage Group. We took a look at the branding of the group and added in her own personal style to create a new set of images for her this year.

(above) Shot in our home studio in Whitby this portrait of Nicolee was created in tandem. Using our new love seat and Nicolee’s great sense of style. The casual nature of this image will compliment nicely her over arching branding for her mortgage business.

We used the navy blue with that hint of teal for the background in the images. Outfits were picked in tonal blues for the more formal images of the session. That tonal look gives a sophisticated look in tandem with the branding of the group and Nicolee’s personal style.

To wrap up our session we worked on a new format of image where we seated Nicolee using paper to match the background on the table. The end result is a powerful image of this professional mortgage broker.

Kirsten McGoey | Visual Storyteller | Trinity Design Photography

The Visual Story of Rebecca Munn – Durham Region

The Visual Story of Rebecca Munn – Durham Region

Just over a year ago Trinity Design Photography created editorial headshots and story images for Durham Region and Whitby’s one in a million Rebecca Munn (East of the City magazine). Rebecca, a master seamstress, has been an entrepreneur since she was 16 and was a perfect choice for our test model for our upcoming headshots team photos for companies who work within the 1855 Whitby Innovation Accelerator.

1855 Whitby is housed in a non-descript building that completely wows you when you walk inside. The concrete floors and walls made of bricks dating back to the 1800 and 1900s mixed with glass, steel, and colourful plastics makes for a fresh and creative space.

Rebecca’s brand is clean, modern, fresh and youthful. We kept her outfits simple, in the right portrait she is even wearing one of her own sewing creations. In headshot photography we do not want the main focus to be the clothing but rather it compliments the wearer and moves focus to their face, their personal brand.

This portrait is again proof positive a portrait of a strong, capable and talented woman does not have to feature her smiling. Rebecca’s “blue steel” gaze is just what this portrait needed to make it next level awesome.

The 1800 and 1900s brick background is gently lit with light fall off and the subject is perfectly lit with a one light/reflector combination. Our end product is a strong professional look for this entreprenuer in the building that is now growing some of the latest technological innovators in North America. Long live the entrepreneur.

Kirsten McGoey | Visual Storyteller | A.O.C.A.D. | Trinity Design Photography